Eli Harari, Engineering After Princeton.

1820   13 years ago
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1820   13 years ago
Video feature: Video feature: 'Eli Harari: Engineering After Princeton'
Posted August 19, 2010; 12:00 p.m.
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by Teresa Riordan/nEli Harari, who earned a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton in 1973, describes in this video profile how a successful inventor recognizes a need and changes the world by pushing innovation./nHarari recalls how his research experience at Princeton influenced his work as founder and chief executive officer of SanDisk Corp. SanDisk is a global leader in flash memory, the computer storage technology that is fundamental to a wide range of consumer electronics, from digital cameras to mobile phones./nIn 2008, the Global Semiconductor Alliance awarded Harari the Dr. Morris Chang Exemplary Leadership Award. In 2009, Harari received the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' Robert N. Noyce Medal in recognition of his leadership in the development and commercialization of flash memory technology. He holds more than 100 patents issued in the field of non-volatile memories and storage systems./nThe video was made by Michael Wood, who earned a B.S. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton in 2008.
Posted August 19, 2010; 12:00 p.m.
share | e-mail | print
by Teresa Riordan/nEli Harari, who earned a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton in 1973, describes in this video profile how a successful inventor recognizes a need and changes the world by pushing innovation./nHarari recalls how his research experience at Princeton influenced his work as founder and chief executive officer of SanDisk Corp. SanDisk is a global leader in flash memory, the computer storage technology that is fundamental to a wide range of consumer electronics, from digital cameras to mobile phones./nIn 2008, the Global Semiconductor Alliance awarded Harari the Dr. Morris Chang Exemplary Leadership Award. In 2009, Harari received the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' Robert N. Noyce Medal in recognition of his leadership in the development and commercialization of flash memory technology. He holds more than 100 patents issued in the field of non-volatile memories and storage systems./nThe video was made by Michael Wood, who earned a B.S. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton in 2008.
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